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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2018, Article ID 4857065, 20 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4857065
Review Article

Evaluating Stress during Pregnancy: Do We Have the Right Conceptions and the Correct Tools to Assess It?

1Biología y Salud Integral, Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, VER, Mexico
2Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, VER, Mexico
3Departamento de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, Mexico
4Departamento de Biología Celular y Fisiología, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Coordinación de Psicobiología, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 Ciudad de México, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Tania Romo-González; xm.vu@zelaznogomort

Received 19 July 2017; Accepted 19 December 2017; Published 1 February 2018

Academic Editor: Fabio Facchinetti

Copyright © 2018 Raquel González-Ochoa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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