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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 306257, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/306257
Research Article

Helminth Community Dynamics in Populations of Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Using Two Distinct Migratory Corridors

1Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, TX 78363, USA
2Department of Biology, Lake Superior State University, 650 W. Easterday Avenue, Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783, USA
3Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
41616 Blackburn Fork Road, Cookeville, TN 38501, USA

Received 2 November 2010; Revised 12 January 2011; Accepted 4 February 2011

Academic Editor: Benjamin M. Rosenthal

Copyright © 2011 Jason M. Garvon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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