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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 926706, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/926706
Review Article

A Sequential Model of Host Cell Killing and Phagocytosis by Entamoeba histolytica

1Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, The University of Vermont, Room 320 Stafford Hall, 95 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
2Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, College of Medicine, The University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
3Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, College of Medicine, The University of Vermont, Room 320 Stafford Hall, 95 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, VT 05405, USA

Received 24 November 2010; Accepted 19 December 2010

Academic Editor: D. S. Lindsay

Copyright © 2011 Adam Sateriale and Christopher D. Huston. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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