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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 275436, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/275436
Research Article

Interactions between Leishmania braziliensis and Macrophages Are Dependent on the Cytoskeleton and Myosin Va

1Laboratório de Imunologia e Bioquímica de Protozoários, Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia, FCM, UERJ, Avenida Professor Manuel de Abreu 444 5 andar. Vila Isabel, 20550-170 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Programa de Pós-Graduação em Microbiologia Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, UERJ, 20550-170 Rio de Janerio, RJ, Brazil
3Departamento Biociências, Escola de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-599 Rio de Janerio, RJ, Brazil
4Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biodinâmica do Movimento, EEFD, UFRJ, 21941-599 Rio de Janerio, RJ, Brazil

Received 22 February 2012; Revised 6 May 2012; Accepted 7 May 2012

Academic Editor: Barbara Papadopoulou

Copyright © 2012 Elisama Azevedo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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