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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 643029, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/643029
Review Article

New Insights on the Inflammatory Role of Lutzomyia longipalpis Saliva in Leishmaniasis

1Departamento de Biomorfologia, Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Avenida Reitor Miguel Calmon S/N, 40110-100 Salvador, BA, Brazil
2Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz (CPqGM), Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rua Waldemar Falcão 121, 40296-710 Salvador, BA, Brazil
3Faculdade de Medicina da Bahia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Avenida Reitor Miguel Calmon S/N, 40110-100 Salvador, BA, Brazil
4Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Investigação em Imunologia (iii-INCT), Avenida Dr.Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar 44, 05403-900, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 15 August 2011; Revised 24 October 2011; Accepted 27 October 2011

Academic Editor: Marcela F. Lopes

Copyright © 2012 Deboraci Brito Prates et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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