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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 796820, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/796820
Research Article

Risk Factors for Asthma in a Helminth Endemic Area in Bahia, Brazil

1Serviço de Imunologia, Hospital Universitário Professor Edgard Santos, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40110-160 Salvador, BA, Brazil
2Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Universidade do Estado da Bahia, 41.150-000 Salvador, BA, Brazil
3Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Doenças Tropicais (INCT-DT/CNPq), 40110-160 Salvador, BA, Brazil
4Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, 40290-000 Salvador, BA, Brazil
5Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40.170-115 Salvador, BA, Brazil

Received 14 April 2012; Revised 16 June 2012; Accepted 5 July 2012

Academic Editor: William Harnett

Copyright © 2012 Luciana S. Cardoso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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