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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 930257, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/930257
Review Article

Toll-Like Receptors in Leishmania Infections: Guardians or Promoters?

Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Bloco G, CCS, Ilha do Fundão, Cidade Universitária, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, RJ, Brazil

Received 31 August 2011; Revised 1 December 2011; Accepted 6 December 2011

Academic Editor: Dario Zamboni

Copyright © 2012 Marilia S. Faria et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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