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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 630968, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/630968
Research Article

Comparative Study of the Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites in Low Socioeconomic Areas from South Chennai, India

Department of Biochemistry, Sathyabama University Dental College & Hospitals, Rajiv Gandhi Salai, Sholinganallur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600119, India

Received 27 October 2013; Accepted 29 November 2013; Published 21 January 2014

Academic Editor: Bernard Marchand

Copyright © 2014 Jeevitha Dhanabal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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