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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 823923, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/823923
Research Article

Intestinal Helminth Infections in Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya

1Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Egerton University, P.O. Box 536, Njoro 20107, Kenya
2Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Moi University, P.O. Box 4606, Eldoret 30100, Kenya
3Department of Veterinary Clinical Services, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine & Surgery, Egerton University, P.O. Box 536, Njoro 20107, Kenya
4Department of Gender Studies, Egerton University, P.O. Box 536, Njoro 20107, Kenya

Received 13 March 2014; Revised 4 May 2014; Accepted 5 May 2014; Published 27 May 2014

Academic Editor: C. Genchi

Copyright © 2014 A. W. Wekesa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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