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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 260106, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/260106
Review Article

Rational Risk-Benefit Decision-Making in the Setting of Military Mefloquine Policy

Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N. Broadway, Room 782, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 24 July 2015; Accepted 7 October 2015

Academic Editor: Boyko B. Georgiev

Copyright © 2015 Remington L. Nevin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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