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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 641602, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/641602
Research Article

Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections and Associated Risk Factors among Schoolchildren in Durbete Town, Northwestern Ethiopia

1Department of Microbial, Cellular and Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2Department of Biology, Debre Birhan University, Debre Birhan, Ethiopia
3Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
4Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

Received 13 March 2015; Revised 15 May 2015; Accepted 7 June 2015

Academic Editor: Nirbhay Kumar

Copyright © 2015 Tilahun Alelign et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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