Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 985015, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/985015
Research Article

A Study of Naturally Acquired Canine Babesiosis Caused by Single and Mixed Babesia Species in Zambia: Clinicopathological Findings and Case Management

1Department of Clinical Studies, University of Zambia, School of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 32379, 10101 Lusaka, Zambia
2Vet-Serve Veterinary Practice, P.O. Box 38851, 10101 Lusaka, Zambia
3Kaoma District Veterinary Offices, Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Zambia
4Nsama District Veterinary Offices, Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Zambia
5Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Surgery, Hokkaido University, Kita-18, Nishi-9, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan
6Department of Disease Control, University of Zambia, School of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 32379, 10101 Lusaka, Zambia
7Showgrounds Veterinary Clinic, P.O. Box 30333, 10101 Lusaka, Zambia

Received 31 July 2015; Revised 6 October 2015; Accepted 27 October 2015

Academic Editor: Ana Maria Jansen

Copyright © 2015 King Shimumbo Nalubamba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A retrospective and prospective analysis of clinical records of dogs diagnosed with Babesia infections was carried out for the years 2000 to 2013 from practices in Lusaka, Zambia. Records of 363 dogs with confirmed Babesia infections were analysed using demographic factors including sex, breed, age, and clinical signs in relation to haematological findings and Babesia species. The clinical and laboratory findings observed are described as well as Babesia species identification. The study included 18 breeds and the highest proportion were mongrels (32.2%), males representing 64.5% of the population. The most common presenting problems were anorexia (65.3%) and lethargy/weakness (65.3%). The most common clinical signs were fever (87.3%), pallor (52.3%), lymphadenopathy (47.4%), and presence of ticks (44.9%). Anaemia (96.4%) and nucleated erythrocytes (42.2%) were the most common laboratory findings. A mixed infection of Babesia rossi and Babesia gibsoni was present in 59.7% of dogs, whilst 8% and 32.2% had B. rossi and B. gibsoni as a single infection, respectively. Case management mainly involved therapy with tetracyclines and imidocarb and was usually accompanied by clinical improvement. This study highlights, for the first time, the presence of B. gibsoni in natural dog populations in Zambia, where previously only B. rossi was reported.