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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1769585, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1769585
Research Article

Immune Profile of Honduran Schoolchildren with Intestinal Parasites: The Skewed Response against Geohelminths

1Department of Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada
2School of Microbiology, National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH), Tegucigalpa, Honduras
3Microbiology Research Institute, National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH), Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Received 16 August 2016; Accepted 10 October 2016

Academic Editor: Emmanuel Serrano Ferron

Copyright © 2016 José Antonio Gabrie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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