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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1859737, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1859737
Research Article

Intestinal Schistosomiasis among Primary Schoolchildren in Two On-Shore Communities in Rorya District, Northwestern Tanzania: Prevalence, Intensity of Infection and Associated Risk Factors

1Department of Global Health and Biomedical Sciences, School of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 447, Arusha, Tanzania
2Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, University of Dodoma, P.O. Box 259, Dodoma, Tanzania
3National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), Mwanza Research Centre, Isamilo Road, P.O. Box 1462, Mwanza, Tanzania

Received 14 July 2016; Accepted 15 September 2016

Academic Editor: Emmanuel Serrano Ferron

Copyright © 2016 David Z. Munisi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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