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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7680124, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7680124
Research Article

Current Status of Soil-Transmitted Helminths among School Children in Kakamega County, Western Kenya

1Karatina University, P.O. Box 1957-10101, Karatina, Kenya
2Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Eastern and Southern Africa Centre of International Parasite Control, P.O. Box 54840-00200, Nairobi, Kenya
3Technical University of Kenya (TUK), P.O. Box 52428-00200, Nairobi, Kenya
4Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-00202, Nairobi, Kenya
5Division of Vector Borne Diseases, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 20750-00202, Nairobi, Kenya

Received 17 February 2016; Revised 20 May 2016; Accepted 24 May 2016

Academic Editor: Emmanuel Serrano Ferron

Copyright © 2016 Teresia Ngonjo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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