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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 5751743, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5751743
Research Article

Seroprevalence of Asymptomatic Leishmania donovani among Laborers and Associated Risk Factors in Agricultural Camps of West Armachiho District, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

1Department of Medical Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
2Department of Medical Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
3Department of Medical Parasitology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
4Department of Advanced Clinical Pediatrics and Child Health Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia

Correspondence should be addressed to Animen Ayehu; moc.liamg@dtu.uheya692xena

Received 11 August 2018; Revised 9 November 2018; Accepted 15 November 2018; Published 28 November 2018

Academic Editor: D. S. Lindsay

Copyright © 2018 Animen Ayehu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, also called kala-azar) is a public health problem in Ethiopia, especially in sesame and sorghum growing areas. Compared to other populations, labor migrants are the most exposed. Knowing the seroprevalence of Leishmania donovani and associated risk factors is essential to design appropriate control measures. The main aim of this study was to assess the seroprevalence of asymptomatic L. donovani among laborers and associated risk factors in agricultural camps of West Armachiho district, Northwest Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was conducted to know the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of L. donovani infection. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 185 laborers from October to December 2017. A simple random sampling technique was used to select study participants from selected agricultural camps. After obtaining written informed consent, data were collected using a structured pretested Amharic version questionnaire using the interview technique. A single finger prick blood sample was collected from the study participants and the blood samples were subjected to the serological diagnostic method using the rk39 kit. The multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify risk factors associated with L. donovani infection. Result. Among 185 participants examined using rk39, 14 (7.6%) were seroreactive for L. donovani. Leishmania donovani infection had a statistically significant association with sleeping under Balanites trees (AOR: 4.36, 95%CI: 1.186-16.06), presence of domestic animals near sleeping place (AOR: 4.68, 95% CI: 1.25-17.56), and lack of knowledge about VL transmission (AOR: 3.79, 95% CI: 1.07-13.47). Conclusion. Seroprevalence of asymptomatic L. donovani among laborers in agricultural camps of West Armachiho was low. Prevention measures and health education about risk factors that expose to L. donovani infection for the laborers are essential to prevent the spread of the disease.