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Journal of Probability and Statistics
Volume 2010, Article ID 642379, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/642379
Research Article

Spatial Scan Statistics Adjusted for Multiple Clusters

1Personal Market - Property Strategic Research Team, Liberty Mutual Group, 175 Berkeley Street 10GH, Boston, MA 02116-4715, USA
2Departamento de Estatística, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Harvard Medical School, 133 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA

Received 26 November 2009; Revised 24 March 2010; Accepted 9 June 2010

Academic Editor: Rongling Wu

Copyright © 2010 Zhenkui Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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