Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Sensors
Volume 2016, Article ID 6086752, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6086752
Research Article

Ru-Based Thin Film Temperature Sensor for Space Environments: Microfabrication and Characterization under Total Ionizing Dose

1Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Avenida de la Universitat, s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Spain
2INESC Microsystems and Nanotechnologies (INESC-MN) and Physics Department, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon University, R. Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon, Portugal
3International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), Avenida Mestre José Veiga, 4715-31 Braga, Portugal

Received 15 December 2015; Revised 29 February 2016; Accepted 21 March 2016

Academic Editor: Oleg Lupan

Copyright © 2016 S. I. Ravelo Arias et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. W. Göpel, J. Hesse, and J. N. Zemel, Eds., Sensors, VCH Press, Weinheim, Germany, 1990.
  2. R. W. Willekers, F. Mathu, H. C. Meijer, and H. Postma, “Thick film thermometers with predictable R-T characteristics and very low magnetoresistance below 1 K,” Cryogenics, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 351–355, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. I. Bat'ko, K. Flachbart, M. Somora, and D. Vanický, “Design of RuO2-based thermometers for the millikelvin temperature range,” Cryogenics, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 105–108, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. Ylöstalo, P. Berglund, T. O. Niinikoski, and R. Voutilainen, “Cryogenic temperature measurement for large applications,” Cryogenics, vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 1033–1038, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. G. G. Ihas, L. Frederick, and J. P. McFarland, “Low temperature thermometry in high magnetic fields,” Journal of Low Temperature Physics, vol. 113, no. 5-6, pp. 963–968, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. R. Sahul, V. Tasovski, and T. S. Sudarshan, “Ruthenium oxide cryogenic temperature sensors,” Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, vol. 125, no. 2, pp. 358–362, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. S. Zhuiykov, D. O'Brien, and M. Best, “Water quality assessment by an integrated multi-sensor based on semiconductor RuO2 nanostructures,” Measurement Science and Technology, vol. 20, no. 9, Article ID 095201, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. S. Moreno, D. R. Muñoz, S. Cardoso, S. C. Berga, A. E. N. Antón, and P. J. P. de Freitas, “A Non-invasive thermal drift compensation technique applied to a spin-valve magnetoresistive current sensor,” Sensors, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 2447–2458, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. R. Slatter and B. Goffin, “Magnetoresistive current sensors for high accuracy, high bandwidth current measurement in spacecraft power electronics,” in Proceedings of the European Space Power Conference, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, April 2014.
  10. M. N. de Parolis and W. Pinter-Krainer, “Current and future techniques for spacecraft thermal control 1. Design drivers and current technologies,” ESA Bulletin 87, European Space Agency, Paris, France, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  11. NASA, Goes I-M Databook, DRL 101-08, Rev. 1, 1996.
  12. ESCC, “Total dose steady-state irradiation test method,” ESA-ESCC Basic specification no. 22900, issue 4, ESCC, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  13. R. Ferreira, S. Cardoso, P. P. Freitas, R. Petrova, and S. McVitie, “Influence of ion beam assisted deposition parameters on the growth of MgO and CoFeB,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 111, no. 7, Article ID 07C117, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus