Journal of Skin Cancer
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Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision57 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor-

A Profile and Three-Year Follow-Up of Patients with Basal Cell Carcinoma in the Western Cape, South Africa

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 Journal profile

Journal of Skin Cancer publishes clinical and translational research on the detection, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of skin malignancies.

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Journal of Skin Cancer maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

The Application of Differing Machine Learning Algorithms and Their Related Performance in Detecting Skin Cancers and Melanomas

Skin cancer, and its less common form melanoma, is a disease affecting a wide variety of people. Since it is usually detected initially by visual inspection, it makes for a good candidate for the application of machine learning. With early detection being key to good outcomes, any method that can enhance the diagnostic accuracy of dermatologists and oncologists is of significant interest. When comparing different existing implementations of machine learning against public datasets and several we seek to create, we attempted to create a more accurate model that can be readily adapted to use in clinical settings. We tested combinations of models, including convolutional neural networks (CNNs), and various layers of data manipulation, such as the application of Gaussian functions and trimming of images to improve accuracy. We also created more traditional data models, including support vector classification, K-nearest neighbor, Naïve Bayes, random forest, and gradient boosting algorithms, and compared them to the CNN-based models we had created. Results had indicated that CNN-based algorithms significantly outperformed other data models we had created. Partial results of this work were presented at the CSET Presentations for Research Month at the Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Review Article

Biomimetic Nanoscale Materials for Skin Cancer Therapy and Detection

Skin cancer has developed as one of the most common types of cancer in the world, with a significant impact on public health impact and the economy. Nanotechnology methods for cancer treatment are appealing since they allow for the effective transport of medicines and other biologically active substances to specific tissues while minimizing harmful consequences. It is one of the most significant fields of research for treating skin cancer. Various nanomaterials have been employed in skin cancer therapy. The current review will summarize numerous methods of treating and diagnosing skin cancer in the earliest stages. There are numerous skin cancer indicators available for the prompt diagnosis of this type of disease. Traditional approaches to skin cancer diagnosis are explored, as are their shortcomings. Electrochemical and optical biosensors for skin cancer diagnosis and management were also discussed. Finally, various difficulties concerning the cost and ease of use of innovative methods should be addressed and overcome.

Research Article

Clinicopathological Analysis and Surgical Outcome of Eyelid Malignancies: A Study of 332 Cases

Background. Eyelid tumours are common in our ophthalmic practice. Malignancy cases account only for one-fourth of all eyelid tumours. The most aggressive eyelid malignancy is sebaceous gland carcinoma, but its occurrences are rare in western countries. We found sebaceous gland carcinoma is as common as basal cell carcinoma in our clinical practices. Hence, it is essential to build awareness about the more aggressive eyelid malignancies to reduce morbidity and mortality. Aim. To assess the relative frequency of eyelid malignancies in the Bangladesh population, state their clinical features and outcome of management strategies and build awareness about the more aggressive eyelid malignancies to reduce morbidity and mortality. Methods. This was a retrospective case series study of 332 patients in Bangladesh. This study analyzed all the recorded data of the histologically proven primary eyelid malignancies and followed them up for at least six months from 2014 to 2019 (6 years). All patients were managed by surgical excision with tumor-free margins verified on histopathology, either the frozen section or excision biopsy with 2–3 mm microscopic view of normal tissue followed by eyelid reconstruction. Computer-based statistical software SPSS was used for the analysis, and an appropriate test of significance (chi-square) was used for the statistical analysis. Results. Sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC) was the highest in occurrence, at 42%, followed by 38% basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 18% squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), and 02% malignant melanoma (MM). The mean age at presentation of SGC, BCC, SqCC, and MM were 57.41 years, 62.56 years, 64.73 years, and 59.28 years, respectively. Female (59%) was slightly more preponderance over the male (41%) for SGC than other malignancies. Pigmentation was associated with malignant melanoma (100%) and BCC (81%). Statistically, a significant difference was found between eyelid malignancies, including location, size, pigmentation, recurrence, and invasiveness. The recurrence rate was low lower in the patients who underwent frozen section biopsy (3%) for margin clearance than those who underwent excision biopsy (21.5%) in the follow-up time. Conjunctival map biopsy (8%) was performed as an essential tool for excluding the pagetoid spread of SGC. A new reconstruction method named triangular-shaped musculocutaneous tail flap was performed in 33 (11%) patients to reconstruct the moderate eyelid defect following local resection. Conclusion. Sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC) was the highest occurrence found to be the highest occurrence among all eyelid malignancies in Bangladesh. SGC is more aggressive and the recurrence rate was higher than BCC and SqCC.

Research Article

Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice toward Skin Cancer Prevention and Detection among Jordanian Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

Introduction. Skin cancer is one of the most growing types of cancer, especially in the Mediterranean, even though it is a preventable disease. The purpose of this study is to assess medical students’ knowledge, attitude, and practice about skin cancer prevention and detection. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated structured questionnaire covering the areas of knowledge, attitude, and practice of the study participants. Results. The study involved 1530 students; 55.3% were females. Most of the students possessed proper knowledge about skin cancer (81%). The most prevalent skin cancer risk factors were sun exposure during the day (83.5%) and immunosuppression (71.2%). More than half of the students did not have any habits of skin examination (61.5%). 20% of the students never used sunscreen, while only 20% of them avoided sun exposure during day hours. Conclusion. The general level of the medical students’ knowledge of skin cancer and its risk factors appeared to be higher than what is found in other studies; it is reasonable as the study participants were medical students. However, the protective behavior from the sun was inadequate when compared to the level of knowledge reported. Additional education about the behavior toward sun exposure and protection against skin cancer may be needed to be implemented in the dermatology curriculum.

Research Article

UV-Induced Skin Cancer Knowledge, Sun Exposure, and Tanning Behavior among University Students: Investigation of an Opportunity Sample of German University Students

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the most important risk factor for developing skin cancer. University students can be considered as a particularly high-risk group for long- and short-term adverse effects of UVR due to intensive solar UVR exposure and high rates of sunburn. While validated questionnaires for assessing solar UVR exposure and sun protection behavior are available in German, a questionnaire for assessing the level of knowledge about this topic is still missing. We conducted a literature search for cross-sectional studies assessing skin cancer and sun protection knowledge among university students in Medline (via PubMed) and analyzed existing questionnaires and topics contained therein. We chose to translate the “Skin Cancer and Sun Knowledge Scale” referring to the TRAPD method into the German language and pilot-tested the translation with an opportunity sample of German students. The literature search revealed 36 eligible studies. Four major topics were identified within the studies: knowledge on skin cancer, risk factors, UVR, and sun protection measures. One hundred and seven German university students (86.0% female) with a mean age of 26.25 years (SD ± 4.58; range: 19–46) participated in our pilot study. The internal reliability of the scale was KR-20 = 0.624. We discovered an improvable level of knowledge in terms of skin cancer among the study population. Statistical analyses revealed no significant associations between the level of knowledge and UVR exposure or tanning behavior, respectively. The skin cancer and sun protection knowledge of German university students should be examined thoroughly. While the psychometric properties of the SCSK require further thorough investigation, first empirical experiences indicate the suitability of the tool to assess the level of knowledge regarding skin cancer and sun protection.

Research Article

Factors Associated with Skin Cancers in People with Albinism in Togo

Objective. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with skin cancers in people with albinism (PWA) in Togo. Method. This is a retrospective analytical study of the records of PWA examined during five dermatological consultation campaigns from 2019 to 2021. Results. During the study period, 517 PWA were seen. Sixty-four (12.3%) of these PWA had presented with 137 cases of skin cancer. The sex ratio (M/F) was 0.9. The average age of PWA with skin cancer was 39.69 ± 15.61 years and that of PWA without skin cancer was 19.17 ± 15.24 years (). The 137 cases of skin cancers were dominated by basal cell carcinomas (45.9%). These skin cancers were located preferentially in the cephalic region (77 cases; 56.2%), followed by the upper limbs (33 cases; 24.1%). In multivariate analysis, the risk factors for skin cancers in PWA were age over 39 years () and the presence of actinic keratoses (). In contrast, the presence of ephelides () was a protective factor. Conclusion. This study confirms that advanced age and actinic keratoses are risk factors for skin cancer in PWA, in connection with the cumulative role of solar radiation. Its originality lies in the identification of ephelides as a protective factor. The knowledge and consideration of these risk factors will make it possible to optimise strategies for the prevention of skin cancers in PWA.

Journal of Skin Cancer
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision57 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.