Journal of Skin Cancer
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision34 days
Acceptance to publication75 days
CiteScore1.920
Impact Factor-
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Skin Cancer Prevalence in Outdoor Workers of Ski Resorts

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 Journal profile

Journal of Skin Cancer publishes clinical and translational research on the detection, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of skin malignancies.

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Journal of Skin Cancer maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

An Analysis of Biopsies for Suspected Skin Cancer at a Tertiary Care Dermatology Clinic in the Western Cape Province of South Africa

Background. Skin cancer is a growing health concern worldwide. It is the most common malignancy in South Africa and places a large burden on the public healthcare sector. There is a paucity of published scientific data on skin cancer in South Africa. Objectives. To report the findings of biopsies performed in patients with suspected skin cancer attending the Tygerberg Academic Hospital (TAH) Dermatology outpatient department (OPD) in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Methodology: A retrospective chart review identified all patients who underwent a biopsy for a suspected skin cancer diagnosis between September 2015 and August 2016 at the TAH dermatology OPD. Results. A total number of 696 biopsies from 390 participants were identified, of which 460 were histologically confirmed as malignant lesions. The proportion of clinically suspected skin cancers that were histologically confirmed as cancer was 68%. The most commonly occurring malignancies were basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (54.8%), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (18.9%), squamous cell carcinoma in-situ (SCCI) (8.0%), Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) (6.7%), malignant melanoma (MM) (6.1%), and keratoacanthoma (KA) (4.6%). The number needed to treat (NTT) for all cancers diagnosed and for MM was 1.5 and 4 respectively. BCC (89.3%) and KS (67.7%) was the most common skin cancer in the white and black population respectively. The ratio of BCC to SCC was 2.03. Conclusion. This study provides valuable scientific data on the accuracy of skin cancer diagnosis, distribution and patient demographics in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, on which further research can be based. The study highlights the burden of skin cancer on this specific population group and calls for standardised reporting methods and increased surveillance of skin cancers.

Research Article

Male Sex is an Inherent Risk Factor for Basal Cell Carcinoma

In conclusion, females are probably born with an inherently higher risk to develop BCC; however, also with a much slower increase rate of this risk as a function of age. Notably this observation seems to be not a BCC peculiarity. Because of its high incidence coupled with moderate morbidity and extremely low mortality rates, BCC may serve as a valuable, single-tumor paradigm to reproach the complex mechanisms that underline the interaction of age and sex in the pathogenesis of human malignancies.

Clinical Study

Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer at Critical Facial Sites: Results and Strategies of the Surgical Treatment of 102 Patients

Background. To evaluate the surgical treatment results of a consecutive series of patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer in critical facial regions such as the nose, lip, eyelid, ear, forehead, cheek, and chin. Methods. This was a prospective observational cohort study evaluating the surgical treatment results of 102 patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer who underwent surgical excision and required some type of reconstruction. The reconstruction strategy used, histological type and margins, aesthetic result, and complications were evaluated. Results. The most common facial site was the nose (48.01%), followed by the eyelid, ear, cheek, forehead, and lip. The most frequently used type of reconstruction was the advancement flap (30.39%), followed by transposition flap (27,45%), rotation flap (14.70%), and grafts (10.78%). Basal cell carcinoma was the most frequent histological type, accounting for 90.19% of the sample, with 54.90% of these cases being of the nodular subtype. Disease-free margins were obtained in 94.11% of the patients, and only one patient presented compromised margins and underwent marginal extension. A good cosmetic result was found in 93.13% of the participants. Conclusion. Surgical treatment can provide excellent oncological, functional, and cosmetic results in the treatment of patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer at critical facial sites.

Clinical Study

Sternectomy for Treating Advanced Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

Introduction. Skin cancer is a rare indication of sternectomy. Our goal is to report the clinical course of seven patients who underwent sternectomy for skin cancer. Methods. The survey data were collected from medical records of patients treated between 2008 and 2018 at Ceará Cancer Institute. Results. All patients had prolonged sunlight exposure and average disease time of two years and age of 60 years. Most patients recovered favorably after treatment with prolonged survival. Conclusion. Sternectomy remains an option with curative purposes for locally advanced skin cancer.

Research Article

Immunohistochemical Analysis of BRAF (V600E) Mutation and P16 Expression in Malignant Melanoma in Lagos, Nigeria: A 10-Year Retrospective Study

Background. In Blacks, malignant melanoma (MM) is associated with greater morbidity and mortality compared to Caucasians. MMs with BRAF V600E mutation as well as those with loss of p16 protein expression are associated with aggressive behavior and worse prognosis. Objectives. We determined BRAF (V600E) mutation status and loss of p16 expression in MM cases in Lagos, Nigeria, and correlated these with histopathologic parameters and patients’ age. Methods. Forty-five cases of MM received between January 2005 and December 2014 in the Anatomic and Molecular Pathology Department of Lagos University Teaching Hospital were subjected to immunohistochemical studies to determine BRAF V600E mutation and p16 protein expression. These included cutaneous (n=37), musosal (n=3), and ocular MM (n=2) as well as lymph node metastatases (n=3). Results. BRAF (V600E) mutations were detected in 5/45 (11%) while 31/45 (69%) of the cases had loss of p16 expression. No statistically significant association was found between the BRAF (V600E) mutation, loss of p16 expression, and histologic parameters such as histologic variant, Clark level, Breslow thickness, and ulceration. Conclusion. BRAF (V600E) mutation was detected only in a small proportion of cases while loss of p16 expression occurred in most cases which also had high Clark level, high Breslow thickness, and ulceration.

Clinical Study

Risk Factors for Developing Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer after Lung Transplantation

Background. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NSMC) is the most common malignancy after organ transplantation. Lung transplant recipients (LTRs) are particularly prone to develop NMSC as compared to renal or hepatic transplant recipients due to higher dosages of immunosuppression needed. Everolimus, an immunosuppressant used in organ transplant recipients, is thought to inherit a lower risk for NMSC than calcineurin inhibitors, especially in renal transplant recipients. It is currently unknown whether this also applies to LTRs. Objectives. To determine risk factors for NMSC and precancerous lesions after lung transplantation (LTx) and to characterize the effect of everolimus-based regimens regarding this risk. Materials and Methods. 90 LTRs and former participants of the interventional trial “Immunosuppressive Therapy with Everolimus after Lung Transplantation”, who were randomized to receive either an everolimus- or mycophenolate mofetil- (MMF-) based regimen, were enrolled and screened in this retrospective, single-center cohort study. Results. After a median follow-up of 101 months, we observed a prevalence of 38% for NMSC or precancerous lesions. 33% of the patients continuously receiving everolimus from LTx to dermatologic examination compared to 39% of all other patients, predominantly receiving an MMF-based regimen, were diagnosed with at least one NMSC or precancerous lesion (P=.66). Independent risk factors for NMSC or precancerous lesions after LTx were male sex and duration of voriconazole therapy. Conclusion. NMSC or precancerous lesions were very common after LTx, and risk factors were similar to previous reports on LTRs. Everolimus did not decrease this risk under the given circumstances of this study. Patients should be counseled regarding their risk, perform vigorous sunscreen, and undergo regular dermatological controls, regardless of their immunosuppressive regimen.

Journal of Skin Cancer
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision34 days
Acceptance to publication75 days
CiteScore1.920
Impact Factor-
 Submit