Journal of Sports Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision59 days
Acceptance to publication19 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-

Fibrosis following Acute Skeletal Muscle Injury: Mitigation and Reversal Potential in the Clinic

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Journal of Sports Medicine publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of sports medicine.

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Journal of Sports Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

The Main and Interactive Effects of Biological Maturity and Relative Age on Physical Performance in Elite Youth Soccer Players

The main and interactive effect of biological maturity and relative age upon physical performance in adolescent male soccer players was considered. Consistent with previous research, it was hypothesised that participants of greater maturity or born earlier in the selection year would perform better in terms of physical performance tests. This cross-sectional study consisted of 84 male participants aged between 11.3 and 16.2 years from a professional soccer academy in the English Premier League. Date of birth, height, weight, and parental height were collected. Sprint, change of direction, countermovement jump, and reactive strength index were considered for physical performance. Relative age was based on the birth quarter for the selection year. Maturity status was based upon the percentage of predicted adult height attained. Linear regression models highlighted that maturation was associated with performance on all but one of the physical performance tests, the reactive strength index. In contrast, relative age only served as a significant predictor of performance on the countermovement jump. This study indicated that physical performance (in the tests studied) seems to be related to the biological maturity status of a player but not their relative age. This finding is important because it suggests that early-maturing players perform better in the majority of physical performance tests, and the commonly held belief that relative age effect influences performance may be overstated.

Research Article

The Influence of Floorball on Hematological Parameters: Consequences in Health Assessment and Antidoping Testing

Assessment of hematological parameters is common in sports medicine. Although physical exercise is an important preanalytical variable, data about acute hematological changes after high-intensity intermittent exercise are scarce. This study aimed to examine floorball as a potential preanalytical variable for hematological parameters used in health assessment and antidoping testing. Twenty-three professional male floorball players participated in a floorball game. Hematological parameters including hemoglobin, erythrocyte count and erythrocyte indices, reticulocytes, white blood cells (WBC), platelets, reticulocytes, and OFF-hr score were assessed at baseline, immediately postgame, and at 2 h postgame. Median hemoglobin concentration decreased significantly from 146 g/L pregame to 141 g/L immediately postgame (). WBC count increased from 7.2 × 109/L pregame to 10.1 × 109/L 2 h postgame (). The median OFF-hr score decreased from 99.5 to 94.2 immediately postgame and remained significantly lower than baseline at 2 h postgame (94.4, ). Looking at individual results, the highest OFF-hr score increased from 120 at baseline to 124 at 2 h postgame. Our findings suggest that participation in a floorball game affects several hematological parameters and consequently can affect health assessment and antidoping testing.

Research Article

Diagnosis of Overtraining Syndrome: Results of the Endocrine and Metabolic Responses on Overtraining Syndrome Study: EROS-DIAGNOSIS

Objectives. Overtraining syndrome (OTS), a common dysfunction among elite athletes, causes decreased performance and fatigue and has no standardized diagnostic criteria. The Endocrine and Metabolic Responses on Overtraining Syndrome (EROS) study identified more than 45 potential biomarkers of OTS. In the present study, we hypothesized that combinations of these biomarkers could be an accurate diagnostic tool for OTS. Methods. We selected parameters with largest difference and fewest overlapping results compared to healthy athletes and highest feasibility and reproducibility. Among the multiple combinations attempted, we chose those that did not show overlapping results, according to the objective. Results. We included 11 clinical parameters, 4 basal hormones, and 5 hormonal responses in Insulin Tolerance Test (ITT). The three selected diagnostic tools were the (i) EROS-CLINICAL, with only clinical parameters, which was suitable as an initial assessment for athletes suspected of OTS; (ii) EROS-SIMPLIFIED, with clinical parameters and basal hormones, when the EROS-CLINICAL was inconclusive; and (iii) EROS-COMPLETE, with basal and hormonal responses to stimulation tests, which was valuable for population-based screening, research purposes, and unusual presentations of OTS. Conclusion. We identified innovative tools with 100% accuracy for the diagnosis of OTS, without the need to exclude confounding disorders.

Research Article

Changes in Renal Parameters during a Training Camp among Handball Players in the Sub-Saharan Environment

The aim of the study was to describe the changes in kidney parameters induced by 10 days of tapering (TP) during a training camp (TC), where the players were preparing for a group competition, in 15 female handball team members of a Division 1 Amateur of Benin, in the sub-Saharan environment. Measures were taken in all the players before and after the intensive training (IT) and tapering (TP) phases in an intervention study. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with the CKD-EPI 4-level race formula, the fractional excretions of sodium (FeNa) and potassium (FeK), the urine potassium-to-sodium ratio (Na/K urine), and the hemoglobin rate [Hb] were determined for all participants. At the end of IT, eGFR and FeNa increased, respectively, by 22.39% () and 143.85% (), but the variation of FeK is not significant (). The number of abnormally low eGFR values (<90 mL/min/1.73 m2) was reduced from 11 to 5 (). At the end of TP, the eGFR and urine Na-to-K ratio remained on average constant () but FeNa decreased by 96.32% () and FeK increased by 144.41% (). The [Hb] rate increased by 9.80% (), and players had inadequate hydration practice. The results suggested that in addition to its already known effects, TP preserves the positive effects of IT on glomerular function in athletes preparing for a competition that presents a major challenge.

Review Article

Spondylolysis in Young Athletes: An Overview Emphasizing Nonoperative Management

Lumbar spondylolysis is a unilateral or bilateral defect of the pars interarticularis, an isthmus of bone connecting the superior and inferior facet surfaces in the lumbar spine at a given level. Spondylolysis is common in young athletes participating in sports, particularly those requiring repetitive hyperextension movements. The majority of young athletes are able to return to full sport participation following accurate diagnosis and conservative management, including a structured treatment program. Surgical intervention for isolated pars injuries is seldom necessary. A progressive physical therapy (PT) program is an important component of recovery after sustaining an acute pars fracture. However, there is a paucity of literature detailing PT programs specific to spondylolysis. Here, we provide an overview of the epidemiology, natural history, radiographic evaluation, and management of pars fractures in young athletes. In addition, a detailed description of a physiotherapy program for this population that was developed at a spine center within an academic medical center is provided.

Review Article

The Effects of Strength Training Combined with Vitamin C and E Supplementation on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Intense muscle contractile activity can result in reactive oxygen species production in humans. Thus, supplementation of antioxidant vitamins has been used to prevent oxidative stress, enhance performance, and improve muscle mass. In this sense, randomized controlled studies on the effect of vitamin C and E supplementation combined with strength training (ST) on skeletal muscle mass and strength have been conducted. As these studies have come to ambiguous findings, a better understanding of this topic has yet to emerge. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the current knowledge about the effect of vitamin C and E supplementation on muscle mass and strength gains induced by ST. Search for articles was conducted in the following databases: PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar. This work is in line with the recommendations of the PRISMA statement. Eligible studies were placebo-controlled trials with a minimum of four weeks of ST combined with vitamin C and E supplementation. The quality of each included study was evaluated using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro). 134 studies were found to be potentially eligible, but only seven were selected to be included in the qualitative synthesis. A meta-analysis of muscle strength was conducted with 3 studies. Findings from these studies indicate that vitamins C and E has no effect on muscle force production after chronic ST. Most of the evidence suggests that this kind of supplementation does not potentiate muscle growth and could possibly attenuate hypertrophy over time.

Journal of Sports Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision59 days
Acceptance to publication19 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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