Journal of Sports Medicine
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Diagnosis of Overtraining Syndrome: Results of the Endocrine and Metabolic Responses on Overtraining Syndrome Study: EROS-DIAGNOSIS

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Journal of Sports Medicine publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of sports medicine.

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Journal of Sports Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Changes in Renal Parameters during a Training Camp among Handball Players in the Sub-Saharan Environment

The aim of the study was to describe the changes in kidney parameters induced by 10 days of tapering (TP) during a training camp (TC), where the players were preparing for a group competition, in 15 female handball team members of a Division 1 Amateur of Benin, in the sub-Saharan environment. Measures were taken in all the players before and after the intensive training (IT) and tapering (TP) phases in an intervention study. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with the CKD-EPI 4-level race formula, the fractional excretions of sodium (FeNa) and potassium (FeK), the urine potassium-to-sodium ratio (Na/K urine), and the hemoglobin rate [Hb] were determined for all participants. At the end of IT, eGFR and FeNa increased, respectively, by 22.39% () and 143.85% (), but the variation of FeK is not significant (). The number of abnormally low eGFR values (<90 mL/min/1.73 m2) was reduced from 11 to 5 (). At the end of TP, the eGFR and urine Na-to-K ratio remained on average constant () but FeNa decreased by 96.32% () and FeK increased by 144.41% (). The [Hb] rate increased by 9.80% (), and players had inadequate hydration practice. The results suggested that in addition to its already known effects, TP preserves the positive effects of IT on glomerular function in athletes preparing for a competition that presents a major challenge.

Review Article

Spondylolysis in Young Athletes: An Overview Emphasizing Nonoperative Management

Lumbar spondylolysis is a unilateral or bilateral defect of the pars interarticularis, an isthmus of bone connecting the superior and inferior facet surfaces in the lumbar spine at a given level. Spondylolysis is common in young athletes participating in sports, particularly those requiring repetitive hyperextension movements. The majority of young athletes are able to return to full sport participation following accurate diagnosis and conservative management, including a structured treatment program. Surgical intervention for isolated pars injuries is seldom necessary. A progressive physical therapy (PT) program is an important component of recovery after sustaining an acute pars fracture. However, there is a paucity of literature detailing PT programs specific to spondylolysis. Here, we provide an overview of the epidemiology, natural history, radiographic evaluation, and management of pars fractures in young athletes. In addition, a detailed description of a physiotherapy program for this population that was developed at a spine center within an academic medical center is provided.

Review Article

The Effects of Strength Training Combined with Vitamin C and E Supplementation on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Intense muscle contractile activity can result in reactive oxygen species production in humans. Thus, supplementation of antioxidant vitamins has been used to prevent oxidative stress, enhance performance, and improve muscle mass. In this sense, randomized controlled studies on the effect of vitamin C and E supplementation combined with strength training (ST) on skeletal muscle mass and strength have been conducted. As these studies have come to ambiguous findings, a better understanding of this topic has yet to emerge. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the current knowledge about the effect of vitamin C and E supplementation on muscle mass and strength gains induced by ST. Search for articles was conducted in the following databases: PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar. This work is in line with the recommendations of the PRISMA statement. Eligible studies were placebo-controlled trials with a minimum of four weeks of ST combined with vitamin C and E supplementation. The quality of each included study was evaluated using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro). 134 studies were found to be potentially eligible, but only seven were selected to be included in the qualitative synthesis. A meta-analysis of muscle strength was conducted with 3 studies. Findings from these studies indicate that vitamins C and E has no effect on muscle force production after chronic ST. Most of the evidence suggests that this kind of supplementation does not potentiate muscle growth and could possibly attenuate hypertrophy over time.

Research Article

Interaction between Age, Sex, and Mental Health Status as Precipitating Factors for Symptom Presentation in Concussed Individuals

Concussions are among the most common neurological conditions, with emergency departments and sports injury clinics seeing hundreds of patients each year. The consideration of risk factors such as age, sex, and comorbid conditions are very important when looking at individual physiological and psychological outcomes after a concussion. The purpose of this study was to look at four comorbid conditions (depression, anxiety, behavioural disorder, or learning disability) and identify any interactions with age and sex in symptom presentation after suffering a concussion. A total of 4,865 participants from the CCMI (Complete Concussion Management Inc.) dataset were used with 1,577 self-identified with a diagnosis of anxiety, depression, a behavioural disorder, or a learning disability. Fixed-factor analyses of variance were used with age and sex as fixed, grouping factors and symptom total and severity as dependent measures. For the individuals who did not have one of the 4 mental health conditions (3,288 control participants), symptom total and symptom severity increased with age (), and females showed more symptoms and a higher symptom severity than males across all ages (). A diagnosis of anxiety or depression exacerbated total symptoms and symptom severity from 25–50% above control levels in the 19 and under age groups, while depression or anxiety exacerbated total symptoms and severity by 10–15% in males more than females over 20. A diagnosis of a behavioural disorder or a learning disability exacerbated symptom severity by approximately 50% above control levels in 13–19–year-old females and in males of 30 years and older. This study highlights how the presence of a mental health condition may alter concussion symptom presentation dependent on age and sex. The identification of risk factors and how they may interact can be of great value to health care providers who manage concussion symptoms and recovery.

Research Article

Acute Neuromuscular Activity in Selected Injury Prevention Exercises with App-Based versus Personal On-Site Instruction: A Randomized Cross-Sectional Study

Introduction. A significant step towards sport-related injury prevention is the introduction of easily accessible smartphone applications (apps). However, it is unknown whether this type of app-based instruction facilitates similar acute neuromuscular and biomechanical characteristics of the preventive exercises as achieved when instructed on-site by an expert. Thus, the aim was to evaluate acute neuromuscular characteristics observed during a single bout of selected lower extremity injury preventive exercises instructed by an on-screen app versus on-site individual instruction provided by a physiotherapist. Methods. In a cross-sectional study design, 47 female football and handball players were randomly assigned to receive app instruction (APP group) or on-site instruction provided by a physiotherapist (PHY group) while performing five lower extremity injury preventive exercises. The exercises performed comprised (1) one-legged balance on Airex, (2) vertical drop jump, (3) one-legged horizontal jump onto floor, (4) one-legged horizontal jump onto Airex, and (5) two-hand Kettlebell Swing. Primary outcome was hamstring (biceps femoris and semitendinosus) muscle activity. Secondary outcomes were quadriceps (vastus lateralis and medialis) muscle activity, as well as hip and knee joint angles. Muscle activity was monitored by surface electromyography (EMG) and normalized to the peak amplitude obtained during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC). Hip and knee joint angles were recorded by a 3D motion analysis system. A linear mixed model was used to evaluate the differences between experimental conditions for each outcome variable. Results. Medial hamstring (semitendinosus) muscle activity was significantly higher during one-legged jump onto Airex (17 percentage points (95% CI 7 to 27)) and Kettlebell Swing (19 percentage points (95% CI 2 to 36)) in the PHY group than the APP group. Likewise, the PHY group demonstrated 18 percentage points (95% CI 1 to 35) and 19 percentage points (95% CI 0 to 38), greater lateral quadriceps muscle (vastus lateralis) activity during one-legged jump onto floor and one-legged jump onto Airex, respectively, compared with that of the APP group. Conclusions. Complex exercises, i.e., Kettlebell Swing and one-legged jump onto Airex, are characterized by lower neuromuscular activity when using app-based instructions compared with on-site instruction provided by a physiotherapist. However, the effectiveness of app-based instruction versus on-site individual instruction in injury prevention interventions remains to be investigated in future longitudinally studies.

Research Article

Applicability of Dmax Method on Heart Rate Variability to Estimate the Lactate Thresholds in Male Runners

Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of the Dmax method on heart rate variability (HRV) to estimate the lactate thresholds (LT), during a maximal incremental running test (MIRT). Methods. Nineteen male runners performed two MIRTs, with the initial speed at 8 km·h−1 and increments of 1 km·h−1 every 3 minutes, until exhaustion. Measures of HRV and blood lactate concentrations were obtained, and lactate (LT1 and LT2) and HRV (HRVTDMAX1 and HRVTDMAX2) thresholds were identified. ANOVA with Scheffe’s post hoc test, effect sizes (d), the bias ± 95% limits of agreement (LoA), standard error of the estimate (SEE), Pearson’s (r), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated to assess validity. Results. No significant differences were observed between HRVTDMAX1 and LT1 when expressed for speed (12.1 ± 1.4 km·h−1 and 11.2 ± 2.1 km·h−1; ; d = 0.45; r = 0.46; bias ± LoA = 0.8 ± 3.7 km·h−1; SEE = 1.2 km·h−1 (95% CI, 0.9–1.9)). Significant differences were observed between HRVTDMAX2 and LT2 when expressed for speed (12.0 ± 1.2 km·h−1 and 14.1 ± 2.5 km·h−1; ; d = 1.21; r = 0.48; bias ± LoA = −1.0 ± 1.8 km·h−1; SEE = 1.1 km·h−1 (95% CI, 0.8–1.6)), respectively. Reproducibility values were found for the LT1 (ICC = 0.90; bias ± LoA = −0.7 ± 2.0 km·h−1), LT2 (ICC = 0.97; bias ± LoA = −0.1 ± 1.1 km·h−1), HRVTDMAX1 (ICC = 0.48; bias ± LoA = −0.2 ± 3.4 km·h−1), and HRVTDMAX2 (ICC = 0.30; bias ± LoA = 0.3 ± 3.5 km·h−1). Conclusions. The Dmax method applied over a HRV dataset allowed the identification of LT1 that is close to aerobic threshold, during a MIRT.

Journal of Sports Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision45 days
Acceptance to publication19 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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