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Journal of Spectroscopy
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 276981, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/276981
Research Article

2,7-Dichlorofluorescein Hydrazide as a New Fluorescent Probe for Mercury Quantification: Application to Industrial Effluents and Polluted Water Samples

1Department of Studies in Chemistry, Bangalore University, Central College Campus, Bangalore 560 001, India
2Department of Microbiology & Biotechnology, Bangalore University, Jnanabharathi Campus, Bangalore 560 056, India

Received 19 June 2012; Accepted 19 September 2012

Academic Editor: Nives Galić

Copyright © 2013 Sureshkumar Kempahanumakkagari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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