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Journal of Spectroscopy
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 613435, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/613435
Review Article

Standoff Methods for the Detection of Threat Agents: A Review of Several Promising Laser-Based Techniques

1Arkansas Center for Laser Applications and Science, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR 72401, USA
2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32114, USA
3Department of Physics, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA
4U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC, Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060, USA

Received 14 February 2014; Accepted 22 May 2014; Published 7 August 2014

Academic Editor: Eugen Culea

Copyright © 2014 J. Bruce Johnson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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