Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012, Article ID 101465, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/101465
Review Article

Oxidative Stress Induced by MnSOD-p53 Interaction: Pro- or Anti-Tumorigenic?

Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA

Received 13 May 2011; Revised 20 July 2011; Accepted 3 August 2011

Academic Editor: Paolo Pinton

Copyright © 2012 Delira Robbins and Yunfeng Zhao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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