Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 365769, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/365769
Review Article

The Interplay between ROS and Ras GTPases: Physiological and Pathological Implications

1Department of Biotechnology, University of Siena, Via Fiorentina 1, 53100 Siena, Italy
2Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Regione Gonzole 10, 10043 Orbassano, Italy

Received 14 July 2011; Accepted 18 October 2011

Academic Editor: Paola Chiarugi

Copyright © 2012 Elisa Ferro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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