Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 982794, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/982794
Review Article

Reactive Oxygen Species in Skeletal Muscle Signaling

Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Università degli Studi di Urbino “Carlo Bo”, via Saffi 2, 61029 Urbino, Italy

Received 30 June 2011; Accepted 25 August 2011

Academic Editor: Saverio Francesco Retta

Copyright © 2012 Elena Barbieri and Piero Sestili. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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