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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 870125, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/870125
Review Article

Heavy Metal Poisoning and Cardiovascular Disease

1Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul Aziz University, P.O. Box 12713, Jeddah 21483, Saudi Arabia
2Institute for Science & Technology in Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Keele, Staffordshire ST4 7QB, UK

Received 20 May 2011; Accepted 28 June 2011

Academic Editor: Dietrich Büsselberg

Copyright © 2011 Eman M. Alissa and Gordon A. Ferns. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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