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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2012, Article ID 187297, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/187297
Review Article

Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer Disease: Role of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Presenilin 1 Intracellular Signaling

1Section of Pharmacology, Department of Internal Medicine and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, 16132 Genova, Italy
2IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro (IST), Università di Genova, 16132 Genova, Italy
3Department of Health Sciences, University of Molise, 86100 Campobasso, Italy

Received 26 July 2011; Revised 14 October 2011; Accepted 26 October 2011

Academic Editor: Wei Zheng

Copyright © 2012 Mario Nizzari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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