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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2013, Article ID 279829, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/279829
Research Article

The Aryl-Hydrocarbon Receptor Protein Interaction Network (AHR-PIN) as Identified by Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) and Mass Spectrometry

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1319, USA
2Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1319, USA
3Center for Mitochondrial Science and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1319, USA
4The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA

Received 2 August 2013; Revised 9 October 2013; Accepted 14 October 2013

Academic Editor: Robert Tanguay

Copyright © 2013 Dorothy M. Tappenden et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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