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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2013, Article ID 967029, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/967029
Research Article

Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Allergy, Grant Building, 3rd Floor, S370, MC5208, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

Received 21 October 2012; Revised 4 January 2013; Accepted 7 January 2013

Academic Editor: Maria Teresa Colomina

Copyright © 2013 Jing Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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