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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2014, Article ID 690758, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/690758
Research Article

Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern

1Elemental Analysis Section, Sophisticated Analytical Instrument Facility (SAIF), North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya 793022, India
2Center for Advanced Studies in Chemistry, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya 793022, India

Received 23 July 2014; Accepted 14 November 2014; Published 1 December 2014

Academic Editor: William Valentine

Copyright © 2014 Jasha Momo H. Anal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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