Journal of Tropical Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore1.290
Impact Factordue 2020
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Journal of Tropical Medicine has recently been accepted into Science Citation Index Expanded.

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 Journal profile

Journal of Tropical Medicine publishes articles on all aspects of tropical diseases. Topics include pathology, diagnosis and treatment, parasites and their hosts, epidemiology, and public health issues.

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Journal of Tropical Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

High Hepatitis B Seroprevalence, Low Knowledge, and Poor Attitude towards Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Market Women in Bolgatanga Metropolis in the Upper East Region of Ghana

The Bolgatanga Municipal Health Directorate has reported liver cirrhosis among the first three diseases causing mortality from 2013 to 2015. This implicates hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection considering its high prevalence among blood donors in the Upper East Region of Ghana. However, for a vulnerable group such as market women, there is not much information with regard to the prevalence, knowledge, and attitude towards HBV infection. Thus, this study sought to bridge this gap by determining the seroprevalence, knowledge, and attitude of market women in the Bolgatanga Municipality of Ghana, towards HBV infection. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted (from October 2017 to March 2018) among 404 market women using a pretested questionnaire to ascertain the knowledge and attitudes of market women towards HBV infection, while hepatitis B surface Antigen Rapid Diagnostic Test strips were used to screen for the infection. The study revealed that the seroprevalence of hepatitis B among the market women was 15.6%, and majority of the study subjects (>60%) were unaware of HBV infection. Overall, knowledge on and attitude towards HBV infection were low and poor, respectively, with a significantly high number of the market women not wanting infected individuals to be isolated (). A high seroprevalence, together with poor attitude and low knowledge levels, as seen in this study is of great public health concern. The study recommends regular HBV screening for market women for prompt treatment and vaccination as well as continuous health education to increase knowledge level and improve the poor attitudes of market women towards HBV infection.

Research Article

The Effect of Lymphoedema Exercises and Foot Elevation on the Quality of Life of Patients with Elephantiasis

Filariasis is a chronic infectious disease caused by filarial worms. Swelling in the legs in patients with filariasis can result in a significantly lower quality of life. The recommended treatments for patients who experience swelling or lymphoedema are lymphoedema exercises and foot elevation. This research is a quantitative study with a quasi-experimental design including pre- and posttreatment tests with a control group. This study used a cluster sampling method, which is a nonprobability sampling technique. The samples in this study were 48 respondents divided into two groups: 24 respondents from the Nebe Village comprising the intervention group and 24 respondents from the Bangkoor Village comprising the control group. The intervention group conducted lymphoedema exercises and foot elevation three times a week for 15–20 min for 1 month and measured their quality of life using the LFSQQ questionnaire. Measurements of pitting edema and ankle diameter were also carried out. Paired t-test revealed an improvement in the quality of life between pretest and posttest in the intervention and control groups (). The quality of life in the pre-post intervention group improved from 67.42 to 81.58. In addition, the quality of life in the pre-post control group only improved from 62.50 to 72.58. The level of pitting edema decreased from severe (+++) to moderate (++) and from mild (+) to normal (0), and there was no difference in ankle diameter in each group (). The quality of life improved before and after the administration of lymphoedema exercises and foot elevation for each group. Pitting edema decreased before and after lymphoedema exercises and foot elevation for each group. There was no decrease in ankle diameter after lymphoedema exercises and foot elevation in the intervention and control groups.

Research Article

Pattern of Animal Bites and Delays in Initiating Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis among Clients Receiving Care in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

Introduction. Each year, an estimated 25000 rabies death occurs in Africa. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) remains the only proven approach in preventing rabies deaths. Most of rabies deaths occur among those who delayed, did not receive, or complete rabies PEP. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of animal bite, factors associated with delays in initiating, and nonadherence to rabies PEP regimen. Method. Data on clients reporting for rabies PEP in a tertiary hospital setting in Ghana were collected from 2013 to 2016. Demographics, place, and source of exposure were collected. Other information obtained included adherence to the PEP protocol and GPS coordinates of the town of animal bites. The shortest distance between the GPS coordinates of town of animal bite and the site of administration of the rabies PEP was calculated. A total of 1030 individuals received rabies PEP over the period. Results. Overall, 52.9% (545) were males while 47.1% (485) were females. Majority of the cases were between the age group 1–10 years accounting for 29.2%. Dog bites accounted for 96.5% (n = 994). Cats, nonhuman primates, human bites, respectively, accounted for 1.8% (n = 18), 1.2% (n = 12), and 0.6% (n = 6) of all bites. Majority of bites occurred at home (66.2% (n = 646)). Also, 31.6% (n  = 308) and 2.3% (n = 22) of bites occurred on the streets and neighbors/friends’ homes, respectively. Only, 18.7% initiated PEP within 24 hours of bite. Rabies PEP regimen completion rate was 95.2% (n = 976). The median distance travelled to access rabies PEP was 7.87 km (IQR, 3.58–16.27) km. Overall, 34.7% (n = 344) had the animal bite within 4.99 km radius of the treatment room of KBTH. Clients who delayed in initiating rabies PEP were 2.6 (95% CI, 1.3–5.1) times more likely to be males and 2.0 (1.1–3.9) times more likely to receive bites in a location more than 5 km radius from the KBTH treatment room. Gender, age, and distance of bite from the treatment room were not associated with the likelihood of not completing rabies PEP schedule. Discussion. Bites from suspected rabies infected animals remain a problem in southern Ghana. There are significant delays in initiating PEP for rabies prevention. Most animal bite victims are children ten years and below. Male gender and bites more than 5 km radius from the site of rabies PEP administration were most significant factors associated with delays in initiating rabies PEP. There is the need for adopting strategies to encourage prompt initiation and adherence to PEP.

Research Article

Possible Factors Influencing the Seroprevalence of Dengue among Residents of the Forest Fringe Areas of Peninsular Malaysia

Dengue is an endemic mosquito-borne viral disease prevalent in many urban areas of the tropic, especially the Southeast Asia. Its presence among the indigenous population of Peninsular Malaysia (Orang Asli), however, has not been well described. The present study was performed to investigate the seroprevalence of dengue among the Orang Asli (OA) residing at the forest fringe areas of Peninsular Malaysia and determine the factors that could affect the transmission of dengue among the OA. Eight OA communities consisting of 491 individuals were recruited. From the study, at least 17% of the recruited study participants were positive for dengue IgG, indicating past exposure to dengue. Analysis on the demographic and socioeconomic variables suggested that high seroprevalence of dengue was significantly associated with those above 13 years old and a low household income of less than MYR500 (USD150). It was also associated with the vast presence of residential areas and the presence of a lake. Remote sensing analysis showed that higher land surface temperatures and lower land elevations also contributed to higher dengue seroprevalence. The present study suggested that both demographic and geographical factors contributed to the increasing risk of contracting dengue among the OA living at the forest fringe areas of Peninsular Malaysia. The OA, hence, remained vulnerable to dengue.

Research Article

Declining Trends in Childhood TB Notifications and Profile of Notified Patients in the City of Harare, Zimbabwe, from 2009 to 2018

Globally, childhood tuberculosis (TB among those aged <15 years) is a neglected component of national TB programmes in high TB burden countries. Zimbabwe, a country in southern Africa, is a high burden country for TB, TB-HIV, and drug-resistant TB. In this study, we assessed trends in annual childhood TB notifications in Harare (the capital of Zimbabwe) from 2009 to 2018 and the demographic, clinical profiles, and treatment outcomes of childhood TB patients notified from 2015–2017 by reviewing the national TB programme records and reports. Overall, there was a decline in the total number of TB patients (all ages) from 5,943 in 2009 to 2,831 in 2018. However, the number of childhood TB patients had declined exponentially 6-fold from 583 patients (117 per 100,000 children) in 2009 to 107 patients (18 per 100,000 children) in 2018. Of the 615 childhood TB patients notified between 2015 and 2017, 556 (89%) patient records were available. There were 53% males, 61% were aged <5 years, 92% were new TB patients, 85% had pulmonary TB, and 89% were treated for-drug sensitive TB, 3% for drug-resistant TB, and 40% were HIV positive (of whom 59% were on ART). Although 58% had successful treatment outcomes, the treatment outcomes of 40% were unknown (not recorded or not evaluated), indicating severe gaps in TB care. The disproportionate decline in childhood TB notifications could be due to the reduction in the TB burden among HIV positive individuals from the scale up of antiretroviral therapy and isoniazid preventive therapy. However, the country is experiencing economic challenges which could also contribute to the disproportionate decline in childhood TB notification and gaps in quality of care. There is an urgent need to understand the reasons for the declining trends and the gaps in care.

Research Article

Nutritional Status and Humoral Immune Response to Plasmodium falciparum in Children Aged 6–59 Months

Malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Children are mostly exposed to this disease; numerous studies have investigated the relationship between child malnutrition and either malaria morbidity or infection. Few studies demonstrated the interaction between child malnutrition and specific anti-Plasmodium falciparum immune responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of nutritional status and iron on total anti-Plasmodium falciparum IgG levels in children living in the Gado-Badzéré refugee camp. We carried out a cross-sectional study during August–November 2017 in the Gado-Badzéré refugee camp in the East region of Cameroon. Children aged from 6 to 59 months with fever were recruited from the medical center. The data were recorded using a standardized data collection sheet and were analyzed using SPSS and WHO Anthro software. The total anti-Pf 3D7 total IgG level was determined using an ELISA technique while a colorimetric method was used to measure the total iron level. A total of 83 patients aged 6–59 months were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of malaria and malnutrition was 47% and 31%, respectively. Acute malnutrition was statistically less recurrent in noninfected children compared with that in the infected children. The infection tended to have significant influence on the level of anti-Plasmodium falciparum antibodies in children. In addition, nutritional status and serum iron levels had no significant influence on children’s anti-Pf IgG T levels. Malaria and malnutrition remain real public health problems in the Gado-badzéré refugee camp. Knowledge of the nutritional profile of the population would be of great benefit in setting up an appropriate health program. We therefore suggest that more standardized studies be conducted to highlight the effect of nutrition and micronutrients on immunological status.

Journal of Tropical Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore1.290
Impact Factordue 2020
 Submit

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