Journal of Tropical Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate25%
Submission to final decision113 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore1.290
Impact Factordue 2020
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Journal of Tropical Medicine has recently been accepted into Science Citation Index Expanded.

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 Journal profile

Journal of Tropical Medicine publishes articles on all aspects of tropical diseases. Topics include pathology, diagnosis and treatment, parasites and their hosts, epidemiology, and public health issues.

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Journal of Tropical Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

LC-MS Analysis, 15-Lipoxygenase Inhibition, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity of Dissotis multiflora (Sm) Triana (Melastomataceae) and Paullinia pinnata Linn (Sapindaceae)

This study aims to evaluate the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity activities of Dissotis multiflora (Sm) Triana and Paullinia pinnata Linn used traditionally in Cameroon to treat infectious diseases. Phytochemical screening was carried out using the LC-MS procedure. The ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay was used to determine the 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) inhibitory activity of the plant samples. The tetrazolium-based colorimetric (MTT) assay was performed using Vero cells. The Ames test was carried out using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 tester strains. LC-MS chromatogram of D. multiflora led to the identification of four known compounds, namely, 5-(3,5-dinitrophenyl)-2H-tetrazol (2), 2,2'-{[2-(6-amino-9H-purine-9-yl)ethyl]imino}diethanol (14), 1,2,5-oxadiazolo [3,4-b]pyrazine, 5,6-di (3,5-dimethyl-1-piperidyl) (19), and nimbolinin D (20) while four compounds were also identified in P. pinnata known as 2-hydroxycarbamoyl-4-methyl-pentanoic acid (2), pheophorbide A (16), 1-[4-({2-[(1-methyl-1H-indol-5-yl)amino]-4-pyrimidinyl}oxy)-1-naphthyl]-3-[1-(4 methylphenyl)-3-(2-methyl-2-propanyl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]urea (17), and nimbolinin D (18). D. multiflora and P. pinnata inhibited 15-LOX activity in concentration-dependent manner. The LC50 (concentration that kills 50% of cells) values of the extracts ranged from 0.13 ± 00 to 1 ± 00 mg/mL for P. pinnata and D. multiflora, respectively. P. pinnata was cytotoxic at concentrations tested while D. multiflora was not. The selectivity index (SI) values ranged from 0.16 to 10.30 on Vero cell lines. No genotoxic effect was observed against both strains tested. These extracts are sources of compounds which can be used to control infectious diseases and associated inflammation. However, caution should be taken while using P. pinnata for medicinal purposes.

Research Article

Antimalarial Activity of Aqueous and 80% Methanol Crude Seed Extracts and Solvent Fractions of Schinus molle Linnaeus (Anacardiaceae) in Plasmodium berghei-Infected Mice

Background. Malaria is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity. Moreover, the emergence of resistance to antimalarial drugs is a major problem in controlling the disease. This makes the development of novel antimalarial drugs a necessity. Medicinal plants are important sources in discovering antimalarial drugs. Schinus molle is claimed for its antimalarial effect in Ethiopian folkloric medicine and endowed with in vitro antiplasmodial activity. In the present study, the in vivo antimalarial activity of the plant was investigated. Methods. Acute toxicity was carried out using a standard procedure. To screen the in vivo antimalarial potential of the S. molle against Plasmodium berghei (ANKA), a 4-day suppressive test was employed. The extracts and fractions were given to infected mice by oral gavage at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day for four consecutive days. Parameters such as parasitemia were then evaluated. Results. Any sign of toxicity was not observed in the oral acute toxicity test. The crude extracts and solvent fractions exerted a significant () inhibition of parasite load compared to the negative control. The highest inhibition (66.91%) was exhibited by the 400 mg/kg/day dose of 80% methanolic crude extract. Among the fractions, chloroform fraction demonstrated maximal chemosuppressive effect (55.60%). Moreover, crude extracts and solvent fractions prevented body weight loss, reduction in temperature, and anemia compared to the negative control. Except the aqueous fraction, the tested plant extracts were able to significantly prolong the survival time of infected mice. Conclusion. The findings of the present study confirmed the safety and a promising in vivo antimalarial activity of S. molle, thus supporting the traditional claim and in vitro efficacy. In-depth investigations on the plant, however, are highly recommended.

Research Article

Adherence, Awareness, Access, and Use of Standard Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline for Malaria Case Management among Healthcare Workers in Meatu, Tanzania

Background. Effective case management is a vital component of malaria control and elimination strategies. However, the level of adherence to the malaria diagnostic test and treatment guideline is not known, particularly at Meatu district. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the adherence, awareness, access, and use of standard diagnosis and treatment guidelines among healthcare workers in Meatu district. Method. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study, which enrolled a total of 196 healthcare workers in Meatu district. Healthcare workers were sampled purposively to reach the required sample size. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Results. Generally, 189 (96.4%) were aware of malaria treatment guidelines, while 148 (75.5%) had access and 98 (50.0%) used malaria treatment guidelines. One hundred and seven (54.6%) of all the healthcare workers adhered strictly to the diagnosis and national treatment guidelines. Ten (5.1%) partially adhered to the guideline when choosing antimalarials without confirmed malaria cases. Nonadherence to the prescription of recommended antimalarial drugs and laboratory confirmation was 79 (40.3%). Conclusion. Half of healthcare worker’s adhere to malaria diagnostic test and treatment guidelines. Most the healthcare workers are aware of the malaria diagnostic test and treatment guidelines. Continued education and assessment of the personal attitudes towards malaria diagnostic test and treatment guidelines are recommended.

Research Article

Detection of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen among Febrile Patients in Ankpa, Kogi State, Nigeria

Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has become a significant public health problem in developing countries, and the high rate of morbidity and mortality from acute and chronic infections is worrisome. Therefore, this study determined the prevalence of HBV and associated risk factors in Ankpa, Kogi State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods. Sera randomly collected from 200 participants in three public hospitals in Ankpa were screened for HBsAg using commercially available HBsAg rapid test kit (Swe-Care (R), China). Structured questionnaires were used to obtain sociodemographic details and history of exposure to risk factors. Results. Seventeen (8.5%) of the 200 patients were positive for HBsAg. Males had higher prevalence (10.89%) than females (6.06%). The age group with the highest rate of infection was 24–44 years. Patient’s occupation and marital status were significantly higher in relation to HBsAg seropositivity. Risks of HBV infection in Ankpa are sharing of sharp objects (OR = 11.62, 95% CI, 3.59–37.59), multiple sexual partners (OR = 3.39, 95% CI, 1.23–9.38), blood transfusion (OR = 13.74, 95% CI, 4.22–44.71), surgeries (OR = 3.02, 95% CI, 1.03–8.83), alcoholism (OR = 6.94, 95% CI, 2.32–20.75), mouth-to-mouth kissing (), and contact with HBV patient (OR = 4.14, 95% CI, 1.01–17.06). People without prior knowledge of HBV infection were more infected. Conclusion. This study reaffirms the endemicity of HBV in a part of sub-Saharan African country. Public health practitioners should focus attention on apparently healthy patients in developing countries. We suggest inclusion of HBsAg screening for patients coming for routine hospital care.

Research Article

Prevalence of Asymptomatic Malaria among Children in the Tamale Metropolis: How Does the PfHRP2 CareStart™ RDT Perform against Microscopy?

Background. Asymptomatic carriage of the malaria parasites, likewise its misdiagnosis, especially false negatives, due to the use of substandard rapid diagnosis tests (RDTs) has been shown to hinder the progress of the fight against malaria. Method. The study assessed the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria as well as the performance of Plasmodium falciparum-specific protein and histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) CareStart™ RDT against standard microscopy in the detection of malaria infection among 345 children (1–15 yrs) from two (2) basic schools in Tamale Metropolis. Results. From the microscopy (considered as gold standard), prevalence of malaria among the asymptomatic children was found to be 2.6%, with sensitivity and specificity of CareStart™ RDT in detecting P. falciparum infections found to be 55.6% and 93.8%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of CareStart™ RDT were found to be 19.23% and 98.45%, respectively. There was an evidence showing a significant relation between CareStart™ RDT and microscopy in determining malaria infection (χ2 = 30.579, ). Conclusion. Prevalence of asymptomatic malaria among children was found to be 2.6%. The study reported low sensitivity and PPV for PfHRP2 CareStart™ RDT in an asymptomatic population at instances of low parasitaemia.

Research Article

Efficacy of Ivermectin, Liquid Paraffin, and Carbaryl against Mange of Farmed Rabbits in Central Kenya

Mange is a common disease of rabbits globally, and knowledge of efficacy of drugs used in its treatment is critical for effective disease control. The current study evaluated the efficacy of three commonly used therapeutic agents in Kenya against mange. In a controlled laboratory trial, 20 adult rabbits were recruited for the study (16 of which were infested with mange, while 4 were mange-free). The 16 mange-infested rabbits were randomly allocated into 4 treatment groups each consisting of 4 rabbits, while 4 mange-free rabbits formed the negative control group. Treatments were administered as follows: group 1 (G1) received two ivermectin injections at an interval of 14 days, group 2 (G2) was treated with a combination of carbaryl and liquid paraffin applied every other day up to the end of the experiment, group 3 (G3) was treated with liquid paraffin droplets applied daily until the lesion cleared, while group 4 (G4, infected-untreated) received distilled water applied topically on their ears and group 5 (G5, uninfected-untreated negative control) was not treated with any preparation. The lesions were scored and sampled daily to check the viability of the mites. A field efficacy trial of the test compounds was performed using 105 mange-infested rabbits. The results revealed that all the test agents: ivermectin, liquid paraffin, carbaryl-water, and carbaryl-liquid paraffin combination were effective against mange, recording the lesion score of zero for psoroptic mange by day 21 in the laboratory and field trials. Lesion scores in the treated groups were significantly reduced () at the termination of study compared with those of the positive control group in the laboratory trial. A point-biserial correlation revealed a strong association (rpb = 0.79, ) between the presence of viable mites and degree of psoroptic lesions in the field trial.

Journal of Tropical Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate25%
Submission to final decision113 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore1.290
Impact Factordue 2020
 Submit