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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 363520, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/363520
Review Article

Using a Geographical-Information-System-Based Decision Support to Enhance Malaria Vector Control in Zambia

1National Malaria Control Centre, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 32509, Lusaka, Zambia
2Ministry of Health, Headquarters, Ndeke House., P.O. Box 30205, Lusaka, Zambia
3Malaria Research Programme, Medical Research Council, Ridge Road, Durban, South Africa
4School of Medicine, University of Zambia, P.O. Box 50110, Lusaka, Zambia

Received 20 July 2011; Accepted 14 December 2011

Academic Editor: Maria Goreti Rosa-Freitas

Copyright © 2012 Emmanuel Chanda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Geographic information systems (GISs) with emerging technologies are being harnessed for studying spatial patterns in vector-borne diseases to reduce transmission. To implement effective vector control, increased knowledge on interactions of epidemiological and entomological malaria transmission determinants in the assessment of impact of interventions is critical. This requires availability of relevant spatial and attribute data to support malaria surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation. Monitoring the impact of vector control through a GIS-based decision support (DSS) has revealed spatial relative change in prevalence of infection and vector susceptibility to insecticides and has enabled measurement of spatial heterogeneity of trend or impact. The revealed trends and interrelationships have allowed the identification of areas with reduced parasitaemia and increased insecticide resistance thus demonstrating the impact of resistance on vector control. The GIS-based DSS provides opportunity for rational policy formulation and cost-effective utilization of limited resources for enhanced malaria vector control.