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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 940616, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/940616
Review Article

The Host Genetic Diversity in Malaria Infection

1Laboratório Integrado de Microbiologia e Imunorregulação (LIMI), CPqGM, FIOCRUZ, Rua Waldemar Falcão 121, Candeal, 40296-710 Salvador, BA, Brazil
2Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40296-710 Salvador, BA, Brazil
3Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40296-710 Salvador, BA, Brazil
4Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia do Sangue, Campinas, SP, Brazil
5Instituto de Investigação em Imunologia, Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 13 August 2012; Revised 6 November 2012; Accepted 19 November 2012

Academic Editor: Christophe Chevillard

Copyright © 2012 Vitor R. R. de Mendonça et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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