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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 349439, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/349439
Research Article

Prevalence and Pattern of Soil-Transmitted Helminthic Infection among Primary School Children in a Rural Community in Imo State, Nigeria

1Department of Paediatrics, Imo State University Teaching Hospital, P.O. Box 1644, Orlu, Imo State, Nigeria
2Department of Paediatrics, Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
3Department of Paediatrics, University of Jos Teaching Hospital, Plateau State, Nigeria

Received 26 June 2015; Accepted 31 August 2015

Academic Editor: Kenneth E. Olson

Copyright © 2015 Kelechi Kenneth Odinaka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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