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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 102636, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/102636
Review Article

Targeted Treatment of Differentiated and Medullary Thyroid Cancer

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 14 January 2011; Accepted 14 June 2011

Academic Editor: Nelson Wohllk

Copyright © 2011 Shannon R. Bales and Inder J. Chopra. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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