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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 201538, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/201538
Clinical Study

Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients with Hypothyroidism

1Department of Endocrinology, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran
2Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center (GLDRC), Razi Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Sardarjangal Avenue, Rasht 41448-95655, Iran
3Nursing and Midwifery, Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center (GLDRC), Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran
4Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center (GLDRC), Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran

Received 28 September 2011; Accepted 27 December 2011

Academic Editor: P. Beck-Peccoz

Copyright © 2012 Mojtaba Mehrdad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Celiac disease (CD) is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. The aim of this study was to find the frequency of celiac disease in patients with hypothyroidism in Guilan province, north of Iran. Methods. A total of 454 consecutive patients with hypothyroidism underwent celiac serological tests antiGliadin antibodies (AGA), antitissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG) and antiendomysial antibodies (EMA-IgA). Small intestinal biopsy was performed when any of celiac serological tests was positive. Results. Eleven (2.4%) patients were positive for celiac serology, and two patients with documented villous atrophy were diagnosed with classic CD (0.4%; 95%). Two patients with classic CD had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) (0.6%; 95%). Six (54.5%) of 11 were suffering from overt hypothyroidism and 45.5% from subclinical hypothyroidism. Six (54.5%) had HT, and 45.5% had nonautoimmune hypothyroidism. Conclusions. In this study, prevalence of CD was lower than other studies. Most of the patients with CD were suffering from HT, but there was no significant statistical relation between CD and HT.