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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 438037, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/438037
Review Article

TSH Measurement and Its Implications for Personalised Clinical Decision-Making

1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Luedenscheid, Paulmannshoeherstraße 14, 58515 Luedenscheid, Germany
2Consultancy Division, North Lakes Clinical, 6 High Wheatley, Ilkley, West Yorkshire LS29 8RX, UK

Received 5 October 2012; Accepted 15 November 2012

Academic Editor: Johannes W. Dietrich

Copyright © 2012 Rudolf Hoermann and John E. M. Midgley. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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