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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 638747, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/638747
Research Article

Antitumor Activity of Lenvatinib (E7080): An Angiogenesis Inhibitor That Targets Multiple Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Preclinical Human Thyroid Cancer Models

1Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine Core Function Unit, Eisai Co., Ltd, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2635, Japan
2Discovery Biology, Oncology Product Creation Unit, Eisai Co., Ltd, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2635, Japan
3Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine Core Function Unit, Eisai Inc., 4 Corporate Drive, Andover, MA 01810, USA

Received 12 June 2014; Accepted 26 August 2014; Published 10 September 2014

Academic Editor: Giovanni Tallini

Copyright © 2014 Osamu Tohyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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