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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 7843972, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7843972
Research Article

Thyroid Disorders in Central Ghana: The Influence of 20 Years of Iodization

1Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
2Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Osei Sarfo-Kantanka; moc.liamg@12aknatnakofraso

Received 22 March 2017; Revised 16 May 2017; Accepted 28 May 2017; Published 4 July 2017

Academic Editor: Massimo Tonacchera

Copyright © 2017 Osei Sarfo-Kantanka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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