Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Transplantation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 675697, 7 pages
Clinical Study

Trends in the Management and Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

1Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, White 544b, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2Department of Medicine, Saint Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, NJ 07039, USA
3Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA

Received 27 March 2014; Revised 18 July 2014; Accepted 18 July 2014; Published 3 August 2014

Academic Editor: Bruce Kaplan

Copyright © 2014 Madhukar S. Patel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Background. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder leading to end-stage renal failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate a longitudinal experience of kidney transplantation for ADPKD. Methods. A single center retrospective review of patients undergoing kidney transplantation was conducted, with comparisons across two time periods: early (02/2000–04/2007, ) and late (04/2007–08/2012, ). Results. Over the 13.5-year study period, 133 patients underwent transplantation for ADPKD. Overall, no significant difference between the early and late group with regard to intraoperative complications, need for reoperation, readmissions within 30 days, delayed graft function, and mortality was noted. There was a trend towards increase in one-year graft survival (early 93.1% versus late 100%, ). In the early group, 67% of recipients had undergone aneurysm screening, compared to 91% of recipients in the late group ( ). Conclusions. This study demonstrates consistent clinical care with a trend towards improved rates of one-year graft survival. Interestingly, we also note a significantly higher use of cerebral imaging over time, with the majority that were detected requiring surgical intervention which may justify the current practice of nonselective radiological screening until improved screening criteria are developed.