Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011, Article ID 389364, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/389364
Research Article

Screening the MayBridge Rule of 3 Fragment Library for Compounds That Interact with the Trypanosoma brucei myo-Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase and/or Show Trypanocidal Activity

Biomolecular Science, The North Haugh, The University of St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland, KY16 9ST, UK

Received 31 December 2010; Revised 23 February 2011; Accepted 23 February 2011

Academic Editor: Wanderley De Souza

Copyright © 2011 Louise L. Major and Terry K. Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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