Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011, Article ID 428486, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/428486
Review Article

Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Leishmania Pathogenesis: The Potential for Drug Target Selection

Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA

Received 7 February 2011; Revised 26 March 2011; Accepted 28 April 2011

Academic Editor: Kwang Poo Chang

Copyright © 2011 Robert Duncan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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