Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011, Article ID 571242, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/571242
Review Article

Use of Antimony in the Treatment of Leishmaniasis: Current Status and Future Directions

1Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, 4 Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata West Bengal 700032, India
2Division of Cell Biology and Immunology, Institute of Microbial Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chandigarh 160036, India

Received 18 January 2011; Accepted 5 March 2011

Academic Editor: Hemanta K. Majumder

Copyright © 2011 Arun Kumar Haldar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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