Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012, Article ID 154283, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/154283
Review Article

RASSF1A Signaling in the Heart: Novel Functions beyond Tumor Suppression

Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, MSB G-609, Newark, NJ 07103-2714, USA

Received 25 January 2012; Accepted 26 March 2012

Academic Editor: Shairaz Baksh

Copyright © 2012 Dominic P. Del Re and Junichi Sadoshima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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