Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 307628, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/307628
Review Article

Hippo and rassf1a Pathways: A Growing Affair

1Molecular Chemoprevention Group, Molecular Medicine Area, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00143 Rome, Italy
2Translational Oncogenomic Unit, Molecular Medicine Area, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00143 Rome, Italy

Received 25 March 2012; Accepted 18 May 2012

Academic Editor: Shairaz Baksh

Copyright © 2012 Francesca Fausti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

First discovered in Drosophila, the Hippo pathway regulates the size and shape of organ development. Its discovery and study have helped to address longstanding questions in developmental biology. Central to this pathway is a kinase cascade leading from the tumor suppressor Hippo (Mst1 and Mst2 in mammals) to the Yki protein (YAP and TAZ in mammals), a transcriptional coactivator of target genes involved in cell proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. A dysfunction of the Hippo pathway activity is frequently detected in human cancers. Recent studies have highlighted that the Hippo pathway may play an important role in tissue homoeostasis through the regulation of stem cells, cell differentiation, and tissue regeneration. Recently, the impact of RASSF proteins on Hippo signaling potentiating its proapoptotic activity has been addressed, thus, providing further evidence for Hippo's key role in mammalian tumorigenesis as well as other important diseases.