Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012, Article ID 365213, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/365213
Review Article

RASSF1 Polymorphisms in Cancer

1Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 3-055 Katz Group Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research, 113 Street 87 Avenue, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E1
2Women and Children's Health Research Institute, University of Alberta, 4-081 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 1C9

Received 3 February 2012; Accepted 1 March 2012

Academic Editor: Geoffrey J. Clark

Copyright © 2012 Marilyn Gordon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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