Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 598984, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/598984
Review Article

Genotoxicity Studies Performed in the Ecuadorian Population

Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de las Américas, Ave. de los Granados y Colimes Quito, 1712842, Ecuador

Received 3 February 2011; Revised 25 November 2011; Accepted 5 December 2011

Academic Editor: Mark Berneburg

Copyright © 2012 César Paz-y-Miño et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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