Mediators of Inflammation

Mediators of Inflammation / 2000 / Article

Open Access

Volume 9 |Article ID 919430 | https://doi.org/10.1080/09629350020002912

Donato Torre, Roberto Tambini, Silvana Aristodemo, Giovanna Gavazzeni, Antonio Goglio, Carla Cantamessa, Agostino Pugliese, Gilberto Biondi, "Anti-inflammatory response of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome", Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 9, Article ID 919430, 3 pages, 2000. https://doi.org/10.1080/09629350020002912

Anti-inflammatory response of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

Abstract

The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an inflammatory process seen in association with a large number of clinical infective and noninfective conditions.The aim of this study was to investigate the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin–4 (IL–4), interleukin–10 (IL–10), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Serum levels of IL–4, IL–10 and TGF-β were determined in 45 patients with SIRS: 38 patients had SIRS of infectious origin, whereas seven patients had non-infectious SIRS. Twenty healthy subjects were used as controls.Serum levels of IL–4, IL–10 and TGFg were determined by an immunoenzyme assay. A significant increase of IL–4 was observed in these patients at the time of diagnosis and 5 days later. In contrast, serum levels of IL–10 were not increased at the time of diagnosis, but a slight decrease was noted after 5 days. Serum levels of TGF-β were not increased at time of diagnosis, and a slight increase was observed after 5 days. Serum levels of IL–4 were significantly higher in patients with infectious SIRS at the time of diagnosis, whereas no significant difference between infectious and non-infectious SIRS was noted for serum levels of IL–10 and TGF-β at the time of diagnosis and 5 days later.During SIRS, serum levels of IL–4 were significantly increased with a significant correlation between IL–4 and mortality, and only levels of IL–4 were significantly increased in the SIRS caused by infectious stimuli.

Copyright © 2000 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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