Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 10 (2001), Issue 4, Pages 217-221
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09629350123338

Analysis of IgE turnover in non-sensitized and sensitized rats

11st Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, 903–0215, Japan
2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, 903–0215, Japan

Copyright © 2001 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background: Although the levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the circulating blood are often elevated in patients with allergic diseases, such levels cannot always be considered as pathognomonic signs of allergy. The induction of allergic reactions in the tissue was inferred to be related to the amount of IgE passing through the vascular wall.

Aims: We attempted to clarify which compartment, the intravascular or extravascular, plays an important role in the regulation of the turnover of rat IgE.

Methods: The level of DNP-specific rat IgE in the serum was estimated by IgE-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the turnover of IgE was analyzed from its pharmacokinetic parameters.

Results: The transfer rate constants from the central to tissue compartment (Kct) were larger than those from the tissue to central compartment (Ktc) irrespective of the sensitized state. The value of the distribution volume of the tissue compartment (Vt) was larger than that of the distribution volume of the central compartment (Vc) irrespective of the sensitized state.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that the short half-life of rat IgE in the circulation could be attributable to the distribution of IgE from the intravascular to the extravascular compartment.